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  • Go And Get It!

    What was, without any doubt, the tightest DanceSport competition ever, the 2017 GrandSlam Standard Wuhan, is now available as a Vimeo on Demand programme at a rate of only US$ 3.25 for three-months streaming. Why?

    21/04/2017 read more ...
  • Open Minds At CDS

    WDSF 1st Vice-President  Jim Fraser was invited to attend the Annual General Meeting of Canada DanceSport. Reporting about the work done by WDSF over the last year, he held a state-of-the-federation address on Breaking and YOG!

    20/04/2017 read more ...
  • Becoming Topical

    One of the conclusions that can be drawn from the recent survey conducted among the WDSF National Member Bodies is that two thirds have, or are keen to have, a section dedicated to street dances such as Breaking. Good news!

    19/04/2017 read more ...
  • Coming Soon

    There is quite a backlog of Vimeo on Demand programmes awaiting release. Firday of this week, you will be able to watch the tightest final ever danced, the 2017 GrandSlam Standard Wuhan, and next week the European Latin.

    19/04/2017 read more ...
  • Calling on Australian Breakers

    The Australian Olympic Committee calls on the b-boys/b-girls from downunder to throw in their hat and submit their videos to take the first step on the "Road to Buenos Aires 2018." The only requirement to participate: age 15 -17 in 2017!

    14/04/2017 read more ...
  • 2017 GrandSlam Wuhan 

    What an amazing event it was, the GrandSlam Wuhan, bringing all the top couples to Central China and having them fight it out over the victory and the purse. The Vimeo on Demand programmes will become available soon!

    13/04/2017 read more ...
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DanceSport Namibia 28/07/2014

DanceSport in Southern Africa Dancing was recognised a sport code by the International Olympic Committee in 1997 but Namibia despite the bug that seems to be biting many a Namibian socialites and lifestyles followers, has sadly not introduced, nor popularized this code in the country. In neighbouring  South Africa, however, this gracious dancing has,  since this announcement, sky-rocketed into the largest single participatory Sport Code of that country.

But Namibia’s Deputy Minister of Youth, National Service, Sport and Culture, Juliet Kavetuna, says, admirably, people from all levels and backgrounds of the South African population are currently eagerly participating in this sport in overwhelming numbers,  to compete for awards at the Olympics.

“As such, this Sport Code has become a major uniting factor among the people of South Africa,  who were, like in Namibia, kept in the past, in different worlds, let alone having physical contact,   as is inevitable in this Code.” She is of the opinion that Namibia, has a perfect example of the feasibility and popularity of this particular sport, right on its doorstep.  “From the South African example it is clear that large numbers of people, including young boys and girls from formerly disadvantaged communities, are passionately grasping the opportunity to partake in this international Sport Code,  and are competing at the Olympics for Gold, Silver or Bronze,” she adds.

Read the full article by Fifi Rhodes in New Era Newspaper here.
Another article on the same topic was published by The Villager here.