Show recent news

Latest News

  • Storytelling

    In Marseille, FRA, the WDSF Communications team experimented with a new format for its coverage on DanceSport: the storytelling clip! Here is one of them: Edlund siblings from Sweden explain the passion for Boogie and Bug.

    17/10/2017 read more ...
  • Get It From Today!

    If you are up for renewal of your Athlete's ID Card, you will be among the first to get the smartphone-based e-Card from today. Eventually, each and every one of the nearly 50,000 dancers in the WDSF competition system will get it.

    02/10/2017 read more ...
  • Digitally You

    B-Boy Kicks from Greece is one of the very first dancers who is issued the new WDSF e-Card. It takes the place of the plastic Athlete's ID Card from October 2017, serving the exact same purposes - but digitally through a smartphone. 

    29/09/2017 read more ...
  • Korean Day In Ashgabat

    On the second day of the DanceSport competitions at the 2017 Ashgabat Asian Indoor and Martial Art Games it was Korea that dominated the field, winning three gold medals in the Latin dances. China and Khyrgystan won one each ... 

    28/09/2017 read more ...
  • DanceSport At The 2017 AIMAG

    After two days of top-level competitions in the eleven DanceSport events that were part of the 2017 Ashgabat Asian Indoor and Martial Arts Games the medals were awarded: China was once more the country with the most gold.

    27/09/2017 read more ...
  • The Other Judging System

    The Trivium judging system developed by the two YOG judges Niels "Storm" Robitzky and Kevin "Renegade" Gopie had its first outing last weekend. It preformed flawlessly in determing B-Boy Spin, GBR, as the winner of BOTY CE.

    27/09/2017 read more ...
Archives

Dans For Mig 15/11/2013

Dans For Mig © 2013 Denmark produces lots of great dancers - but their success ultimately depends on finding the right partner. In recent years, dancers are increasingly being brought in from Russia and other Eastern European countries to form the ideal dance couple.

Fourteen-year-old Mie is one of Denmark's up-and-coming dancers, and the Russian Egor lives with Mie and her mother. They appear to be perfect together. But Egor is having trouble adjusting to his new home, and Mie and her mother also have to get used to the new family member.

Katrine Philp follows the young dancers during the thrilling competitions, at rehearsals, in the dressing room and also at home where Mie and Egor have been living for a year like brother and sister. The pair are working hard for the upcoming European dance championship, and so are their mothers. Talking on Skype, they're eagerly looking forward to their children's possible success. Egor and Mie have big ambitions themselves, but as the film shows, there's a lot more at stake for Egor. (Festival Scope)