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  • Change At The Top

    After serving two years, WDSF President Lukas Hinder resigns to bring the constituent parties closer together in how they interpret dance as sport. After a tranisitionary period, First Vice-President Shawn Tay will succeed him.

    18/06/2018 read more ...
  • On The Olympic Channel

    IOC President Thomas Bach made reference to the Memorandum of Understanding signed between WDSF and the Olympic Channel just hours prior to "We dance TOGETHER," the DanceSport documentary, premiering there.

    17/06/2018 read more ...
  • At The End of Day One

    A gala dinner brought the first day of the 2018 General Meeting in Lausanne to a conclusion. In a short speech and pre-dinner toast, WDSF President Lukas Hinder took a brief look at a day he considered to be truly remarkable.

    17/06/2018 read more ...
  • The President's Hour

    The nearly 200 delegates and observers to the 2018 General Meeting who had gathered at the auditorium of the Lausanne Olympic Museum were able to listen to a highly inspirational speech by the IOC President Dr Thomas Bach.

    16/06/2018 read more ...
  • Do Your Dance

    The delegates to the 2018 General Meeting in Lausanne, SUI, will get to watch parts of the "We dance TOGETHER" documentary as interludes during tomorrow's Gala Dinner Dinner at the Royal Savoy Hotel. You can watch too!

    15/06/2018 read more ...
  • Presidium Meeting Starts

    The Presidium Meeting preceding the 2018 General Meeting starts at the House of International Sports in Lausanne, SUI. GAISF President and IOC Executive Board Member Patrick Baumann addresses the meeting.

    15/06/2018 read more ...
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DanceSport Namibia 28/07/2014

DanceSport in Southern Africa Dancing was recognised a sport code by the International Olympic Committee in 1997 but Namibia despite the bug that seems to be biting many a Namibian socialites and lifestyles followers, has sadly not introduced, nor popularized this code in the country. In neighbouring  South Africa, however, this gracious dancing has,  since this announcement, sky-rocketed into the largest single participatory Sport Code of that country.

But Namibia’s Deputy Minister of Youth, National Service, Sport and Culture, Juliet Kavetuna, says, admirably, people from all levels and backgrounds of the South African population are currently eagerly participating in this sport in overwhelming numbers,  to compete for awards at the Olympics.

“As such, this Sport Code has become a major uniting factor among the people of South Africa,  who were, like in Namibia, kept in the past, in different worlds, let alone having physical contact,   as is inevitable in this Code.” She is of the opinion that Namibia, has a perfect example of the feasibility and popularity of this particular sport, right on its doorstep.  “From the South African example it is clear that large numbers of people, including young boys and girls from formerly disadvantaged communities, are passionately grasping the opportunity to partake in this international Sport Code,  and are competing at the Olympics for Gold, Silver or Bronze,” she adds.

Read the full article by Fifi Rhodes in New Era Newspaper here.
Another article on the same topic was published by The Villager here.